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November 16, 2017

Germany's climate duplicity

Jasper von Altenbockum points out the monumental hypocrisy of Angela Merkel's environmental policies - in the context of her speech at yesterday's climate summit in Bonn. Emmanuel Macron was able to commit France to exiting coal-powered energy in 2020. The reason he is in a position to do so is France's long-standing reliance on nuclear energy. Germany cannot do the same because Merkel herself insisted on the country's exit from nuclear power, as a result of which the country continues to rely on coal. So, Germany got it the wrong way around. This is why we are in the absurd situation where Merkel lambasts Donald Trump for pulling out of the Paris accord, while she herself is not taking the necessary action to meet her pledges under the accord.

Altenbockum makes the point that Germany's energy policy is a total mess, with dozens of reforms all interacting with one another in mysterious ways. There is no way that Germany can meet the various threshold targets for 2030 and 2050. The reason, as a he points out, is that Germany's entire industrial structure - notably the car industry - is incompatible with the goals of the Paris climate accord. In other words, Germany has very similar problems with the Paris climate goals to the US', with the only difference that Germany pretends to adhere to them while the US does not.

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November 16, 2017

Juppé open to join forces with Macron for EP elections

Alain Juppé may have ruled out a common list with Emmanuel Macron’s party - they are not even in the European parliament - but he is not opposed to a common movement for the European elections, notes Le Lab. In an interview with Le Point Juppé considers an alliance between the centre and the right more necessary than ever, at a time when the right is moving further to the right. This is now happening under the new Republican party's leadership of Laurent Wauquiez, whom Juppé accuses of trivialising the Front National and the extreme right, as is happening in Poland. Juppé believes that it is time to open up. But who will be the central figure in all this? Juppé suggested Macron, but also possible are Édouard Philippe, Xavier Bertrand, or Valérie Pécresse. Juppé said that, if Macron stays within the remit of his speech on Europe at the Sorbonne, he does not see any problem with Macron becoming the leader of this new movement. He insists, though, that this is a debate about ideas and not about people. He is neither pro-Macron nor anti-Wauquiez. 

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